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HLNEO - Chronology Page

Lorain-Carnegie Bridge

The timeline of structures at this location reflects our best information to date and is NOT guaranteed to be complete.

Structure #1

PROPOSED BRIDGE Bridge Type:
Years Existed:PROPOSED STRUCTURES
Background Information:
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Structure #2

PROPOSED BRIDGE Bridge Type:
Years Existed:PROPOSED STRUCTURE
Background Information:
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Structure #3

Lorain-Carnegie Bridge Bridge Type:Steel Truss
Years Existed:1932-Present
Background Information: Built in 1932, the Lorain-Carnegie Bridge was declared by the American Institute of Steel Construction to be one of the most beautiful bridges built in 1932. When the Van Sweringens were in the height of their power and built the Cleveland Union Terminal (CUT), the Cleveland Planning Commission realized Lorain Avenue would be a major arterial into downtown and recommended that a bridge needed to be built. After convincing people that steel can be as beautiful as stone or concrete, work began to build the bridge in 1930. The superstructure of the bridge is made up of fourteen cantilever-truss spans. These spans vary in length from 132 feet to 299 feet. The bridge is 5,865 feet in length and is 93 feet above the river. The Lorain-Carnegie Bridge has two decks; the upper deck consists of a 60 foot road way and two seven foot sidewalks; the lower deck (which was never used) has room for two rapid transit tracks and two 18 foot trucking roadways. The railings for the bridge are made from Berea sandstone. The Lorain-Carnegie Bridge is known for its Lords of Transportation. The Lords of Transportation are four huge pylons that symbolize the progression of transportation. They were designed by Frank Walker of an architectural firm of Walker and Weeks. This bridge used 71,000 yards of concrete and 13,000 tons of structural steel. The total cost of the bridge was about 4 million (excluding real estate and property damage). The bridge was built under the supervision of Fred R. Williams and A.M. Felgate. The design was by Wilbur J. Watson and F.R. Walker. The Lorain-Carnegie bridge was closed for three years on October 1st, 1980 for renovation and major repairs. Pollution from the Flats caused erosion of the concrete. Source: Bridges of Metropolitan Cleveland
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